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What Does Patient Safety Mean to You?

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 2, 2016
Updated: Friday, September 2, 2016

As part of ASPPS Member Appreciation Month this August, we asked the ASPPS community to tell us what patient safety means to them. Thanks to everyone who participated!

 

We received many great responses and chose a few that resonated with us to share with you. 

 


What does patient safety mean to you?

“Patient Safety means that every patient who comes to our organization is given care that surpasses their expectations and is given in a way that prevents avoidable harm to them. It means that the processes that our staff and providers are following are modeled after best practices and are evidenced-based and that our staff feels safe to speak up and report issues that are occurring to prevent further issues. Patient safety is about being mindful of an expectation that mistakes can happen and consistently looking to prevent them. Patient safety is about putting our patients first! Patient safety means that I am doing what can be done to provide the right care at the right time, every time.” 

—Sandy Dimas, Accreditation & Patient Safety Manager

Keck Medical Center of USC, California 

“Patient safety means doing the right thing for the right reason when no one else is looking!”

—Diane Schloeder, BSN, director

Scripps Mercy Hospital, California 

 

“I am a public health professor who loves to awaken the next generation of patient safety champions through my courses. Our students take a long, hard look at the patient safety movement over the last two decades, study improvement successes, and consider the challenges ahead. And then we commit to making personal and professional efforts to advance patient safety through safety culture, leadership, technology, staff training, and patient educationPatient safety and quality professionals can support providers and institutions in efforts to achieve greater transparency. We also have the equally important role of engaging and educating consumers about patient safety. There can be no competing over patient safety. For when one of us, whether patient, family, professional, or institution, loses, we all lose. The solutions lie in our open and honest discoveries and shared goals of safe care, patient engagement, and meaningful work.”

—Judy Tupper, DHed, CHES, CPPS
Managing Director, Population Health & Health Policy

Muskie School of Public Service, Maine


“Patient safety is the building block to creating the vision of a highly reliably community, free from harm

in which everyone is physically and emotionally healthy.”

—Bryan Buckley, MPH, Project Manager, Performance Improvement

MHA Keystone Center, Michigan


“Patient safety means commitment of leadership in developing a just culture in the organization. Leadership should take all steps to reach to zero harm. Leaders should develop ways to achieve happiness and trust among all staffHappy staff will work more efficiently and create a healthy environment which more safe. This is the reason that our government is the first in the world that have appointed a Minister of Happiness. I believe that all leaders' vision and strategies should start and end with safety and quality.”

—Sharifa Alamadi, Deputy Director

Al Baraha Hospital, Dubai 

 

"Patient Safety means to heal not to harm."

Muhammad Eltawansi
Patient Safety Specialist, Security Forces Hospital Program Makkah
Saudi Arabia


We’d like to keep the conversation going beyond Member Appreciation Month, so we invite you to add a comment to tell us what patient safety means to you or share what you think about these responses.

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Contact the P.S. Blog by writing to the editor, Patricia McTiernan, at pmctiernan@npsf.org.

 

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Member Spotlight: Rupa Lloyd

Posted By Joanna Carmona, Thursday, July 14, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, June 29, 2016

The American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety (ASPPS) is a membership program for professionals

and others interested in patient safety. This is part of a series of member profiles. 


by Joanna Carmona 


Rupa Lloyd is a member of ASPPS.

 

Rupa Lloyd, JD, LHRM, CPPS, Dell Graham, PA 

 

What does patient safety mean to you? 

It means equipping clinicians with systems and processes that help them to avoid error, and keeping patients from suffering from injuries from the very place they sought out healing.”

 

You did pro-bono work as a law clerk at the Pennsylvania Health Law Project, which advocates for low-income patients. What are some patient safety issues facing this population?

“Many very young, often single parents, with severely disabled children, as well as very elderly patients, are desperately trying to navigate a very complex and disconnected health care system. Often these patients are seeing multiple health care providers at the same time, but each without any communication with one another, or awareness of what treatments the other had prescribed or recommended. 

 

One young mother I worked with had a severely disabled child. She came to our office beside herself with guilt for not being able to afford all of the drugs her daughter had been prescribed. I’ll never forget her gratitude when, by fostering communication among her daughter’s multiple providers, we determined not only did she not need the additional drugs, but taking all of them together may very likely have killed her.”

 

Why did you join ASPPS?

“Through my work as an associate director of medical/health administration for the University of Florida Health Science Center since 2002, I witnessed the impact of increasing financial pressures. I started asking myself: how do we shift the focus to be on health care quality and patient safety first?  In seeking to answer this question, I came to learn of ASPPS and welcomed the opportunity to be a part of an organization full of like-minded individuals, many of them clinicians, and with the same important focus on patient safety.  

 

The goal of becoming a Certified Professional in Patient Safety was an opportunity to become much more knowledgeable in the actual how of patient safety by immersing myself in understanding the clinical side of health care operations and patient safety activities that help clinicians and patients alike in achieving higher quality health care.”

 

How does your law firm help clinicians and patients?

“My role at Dell Graham as a legal advocate and risk manager for clinicians and others in the health care industry is to proactively address, standardize, and simplify the business and regulatory side of health care so that they can give their 100% to providing high quality health care. The work I have the opportunity to be involved in now is the most fulfilling of my professional career.”

 

You said that clinicians are at risk due to a broken health care system. In your opinion, what improvements should be made to make the system better for everyone?

“Two things are crucial for improvement. The first is better coordination and communication among all the fragmented pieces. The second is developing and fostering a just culture within organizations where there is no finger-pointing, shaming, or disproportionate disciplinary actions. This is the key to an environment where every medical error becomes an opportunity to learn and improve upon the quality of health care within the system.”

 

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Joanna Carmona is communications coordinator at the National Patient Safety Foundation. Contact her at jcarmona@npsf.org.

 

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Member Spotlight: Shelley Castellino

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, June 22, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, June 21, 2016

The American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety (ASPPS) is a membership program for professionals

and others interested in patient safety. This is part of a series of member profiles.


by Joanna Carmona 


Shelley Castellino is a member of ASPPS.

 

Shelley Castellino, BSN, RN, Providence Regional Medical Center, Colby Campus

 

Tell us why you chose to get into the field of nursing.

I used to ride horses all the time and on one particular day when I was 22, my horse and I had an argument. He jumped and I was thrown 30 feet up into the air. When the ambulance arrived, I was in a coma. I came out of it nine days later, but was completely paralyzed, and so I thought my life was over. In the hospital, the nurses were fabulous and their positivity was so important to my recovery. Because of that, I wanted to be a nurse and facilitate patients' healing.

 

What brought you to join the ASPPS?

“When I saw what the ASPPS does for patient safety, it really spoke to me. ASPPS allows people to become proactively involved in patient safety. This is necessary as we have a medical system that results in too many medical errors. I feel membership is the first step towards involvement and making a difference for reducing their occurrence. Through patient safety involvement we provide better outcomes for our patients, which, I believe, in turn improves our job satisfaction.”

 

In your opinion, how do you move forward to promote a culture of safety?

“Awareness promotes safety. Awareness of your own self, of your actions, as well as an awareness of the patient, and their response to care matters. As a nurse, I feel that if the staff doesn’t take care of themselves, along with the support of hospital management, we will not have the where-with-all to take care of our patients. I love being part of a team culture where I can stand up and say, I don’t understand or I need help and receive the assistance that I need so I can support my patients.”

 

What is an example of something you (or anyone) can do to keep safety standards high?

“Two things:

 

Listen to the patient. Every body is different. You have to listen because a patient is an expert in his or her own body. If a patient is telling you something is off, perk up your ears and poke around to see if you can find out what the problem may be.

 

Take care of yourself. If you are well rested and alert, you can be your best possible self and the best possible nurse for your patients.”

 

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Joanna Carmona is communications coordinator at the National Patient Safety Foundation. Contact her at jcarmona@npsf.org.

 

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Member Spotlight: Paul Epner

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 10, 2016

The American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety (ASPPS) is a membership program for professionals

and others interested in patient safety. This is the first in a series of member profiles.


by Joanna Carmona

 

Paul Epner is a Lifetime Member of ASPPS

Paul Epner, MBA, MEd, Co-Founder and Executive Vice President for the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine, Chair of the Coalition to Improve Diagnosis, Immediate Past President for the Clinical Laboratory Management Association

 

Why patient safety?

“I was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease at 16. I was subsequently hospitalized many times as an adult with some significant adverse events, giving me the drive to get involved with the patient engagement and safety movement. Coincidentally, I worked for 31 years in the Diagnostics Division of Abbott Laboratories working in the US, Japan, and China. When I left Abbott, it was to focus on issues of patient safety and quality of care, especially from a clinical laboratory focus as I believe the current narrow emphasis on in-lab costs totally misses the economic and patient benefits of a more care-centric clinical laboratory. That led me to diagnostic error, which led me to the Society to Improve Diagnosis of Medicine, and that led me to the National Patient Safety Foundation. It’s been a journey and I'm still on it.”

 

Why did you join the ASPPS?

“My activities following my retirement from Abbott reflect a shift from making a profit to making a difference. I saw what was happening at the ASPPS, I went through the programming, heard the patients’ stories, and I said, ‘This is great! I have to invest in this. This is an investment in me, it's an investment in healthcare, and it's worth doing.’”

 

"This is an investment in me,
it's an investment in healthcare,
and it's worth doing

—Paul Epner

In your opinion, what’s the future of the patient safety movement?

“This movement is critical to strengthening the quality and cost of care. I believe we have made great progress, but that people do recognize we're not there yet, and so the journey is still moving forward. I feel pretty good that with every step forward we will be saving lives and improving the experience for patients.”

 

Could you tell us about your work with diagnostic error at the Coalition to Improve Diagnosis?

“The Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (SIDM) catalyzed the NAS report on Improving Diagnosis, but we recognized that we were too small to maximize the impact of this important work, so we convened the Coalition to Improve Diagnosis in order to partner with like-minded organizations in making diagnosis more accurate, safe, reliable, and efficient. It’s very exciting that the Coalition has grown to 23 major organizations. In addition to the individual actions each organization has committed to implement, we will work collectively to move some major initiatives that are still in the planning stage.”

 

What’s something unique or interesting about you?

“I have been fortunate to inherit many great things from my parents, but with them came a long list of chronic health conditions. In order to combat them, I took up running in my mid-forties and am hoping to run a marathon this year. It won’t be my first. In fact, for my 50th birthday, I ran a 50-mile ultramarathon, but it’s been more than 10 years since my last marathon, so I am really looking forward to the training challenge.”

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Joanna Carmona is communications coordinator at the National Patient Safety Foundation. Contact her at jcarmona@npsf.org.

 

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Understanding and Improving Safety Culture

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