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Top tags: 2016 NPSF Congress  ASPPS Member Spotlight  Voice of the Patient  ASPPS  culture  Leape  med errors  overtreatment  transparency  Ask Me 3  burnout  communication  infection  leadership  patient advocate  undertreatment  antibiotic resistance  apology  Boothman  Campbell  CDC  CPOE  decision support  dislosure  EHR  elctronic health record  engagement  error  falls  families 

Member Spotlight: Sheri Herner

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 1, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, November 30, 2016

The American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety (ASPPS) is a membership program for professionals

and others interested in patient safety. This is part of a series of member profiles. 


by Joanna Carmona 


   

Sheri Herner is a member of ASPPS

 

Sheri Herner, PharmD, MHSA, BCPS, CPPS, FCCP, clinical pharmacy specialties supervisor,

clinical pharmacy specialist in medication safety, Kaiser Permanente Colorado

 

Why did you join the ASPPS?

 

“I joined ASPPS to be part of a larger, multidisciplinary community of people who are passionate about improving patient safety. I wanted to build relationships with people who have the same interests. In addition to being part of a larger safety community, I wanted to join an organization that would help me stay informed about the most important patient safety topics, and I aspired to contribute to the advancement of patient safety initiatives.”

 

"We must teach the science of safety to our colleagues

and trainees and then foster their interest in the field."
—Sheri Herner

What are some of the unique challenges in the field of medication safety?

 

“The medication use process involves many steps including prescribing, verification, dispensing, administration, education, monitoring, and reconciliation. Because it is so complicated and touched by so many people, there are many chances for an error to occur.

 

I am concerned that most community pharmacies do not have easy access to important health information included in electronic medical records. Pharmacists need to know information about illnesses such as concomitant diseases. For example, if a pharmacist is dispensing a prescription for a medication that is eliminated by the kidneys, the pharmacist should have access to the patient’s most recent kidney function tests to check that the dose is appropriate. In addition, they need access to lab results and procedure results to determine if a drug therapy is appropriate for a patient.

 

To help with this, we need an interoperability policy—the ability of different information technology systems to communicate and exchange data— that considers the sharing of pertinent health information to pharmacists who are responsible for evaluating appropriateness of drug therapy for individuals.”

 

In your opinion, what’s the future of the patient safety field?

 

“The patient safety field will prosper through partnering with colleagues who are actively practicing in clinical roles. We must teach the science of safety to our colleagues and trainees and then foster their interest in the field. If we help clinicians make a difference in their work environment, they will be strong advocates in the future and in other venues, even without having the title of safety professional. Those partnerships are critical to moving patient safety initiatives forward.”

 

What is something most people don’t know about you?

 

“One of my favorite activities is to work with clay. I like the challenge of envisioning what I intend to create with a lump of clay and then making it happen. I continually analyze my pieces to learn from my mistakes, and I try to have the same learning attitude in my professional life.”

 

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Joanna Carmona is communications coordinator at the National Patient Safety Foundation. Contact her at jcarmona@npsf.org.

 

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Parallels Between Burnout and Workplace Violence in Health Care

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Next Professional Learning Series Webcast to address overlapping solutions to
two pervasive and growing problems.


by Patricia McTiernan

     
  Michael Privitera, MS, MD    
         

 

Burnout among health care professionals is on the rise, as is workplace violence in health care settings. Could efforts to reduce the overlapping organizational contributions to these problems be a strategy to prevention?

 

Michael Privitera, MS, MD, professor of psychiatry at University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, has long studied and written widely about this question and related issues. As medical director of the University of Rochester Medical Center Clinician Wellness Program and current chair of the Medical Society of the State of New York Task Force on Physician Stress and Burnout, he also sees the impact of burnout, bullying, and violence firsthand.

 

“Burnout affects the worker, other staff, the institution, and patients on a daily basis,” says Dr. Privitera. “We can no longer look at burnout as a problem for individual health professionals to solve on their own.”


Workplace violence, while not as common as burnout, includes not only physical harm, but also psychological and emotional harm from bullying, intimidation, or harassment.


Dr. Privitera has found that while the organizational contributors to burnoutsuch as time and production pressures, changes in technology, and regulatory requirementsare increasingly recognized, some of these same factors may also contribute to increased workplace violence in health care. Likewise, he suggests that some of the same efforts at reducing burnout may also help reduce workplace violence.


“The more we recognize and address overlapping root causes of burnout and workplace violence, the more effective and long lasting our interventions could be,” he says.

 

  Dr. Privitera will speak on this topic at the next Professional Learning Series Webcast, The Overlap between Organizational Contributions to Burnout and Workplace Violence…Is There Overlap of Solutions? Wednesday, December 7, 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern Time. Register at http://bit.ly/burnoutviolence  

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Does your organization have programs in place to address burnout and workforce violence? Comment on this post below. Note: to post a comment you must be logged in. Register or log in.


Patricia McTiernan is editor of the P.S. Blog. Contact her at pmctiernan@npsf.org.

Tags:  burnout  workplace violence 

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Two Myths About the Flu Shot That People Should Stop Spreading

Posted By Joanna Carmona, Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, November 16, 2016

by Joanna Carmona 

 

  flu
 

 

Have you ever heard someone say “I’m not getting the flu shot because it will give me the flu” or “Flu vaccines don’t prevent the flu”? If you have, you aren’t alone. These types of myths are perpetuated every time the flu season pays us a visit, so it’s time to re-visit the facts so you can make an informed decision about the flu shot.

 

The early results thus far during the 2015-2016 flu season show that 66.7% of health care personnel have received flu vaccination coverage, according to this survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Our hope is that this number will continue to rise during the remainder of this flu season and beyond to create healthier communities. The position of the National Patient Safety Foundation is in support of mandatory influenza vaccination for health care workers.

 

Now, if we’re seeing that health care personnel vaccination isn’t at 100% yet, it’s even more important for everyone to know the facts about vaccinations. It’s possible that we all need a quick refresher, so here it is.

 

Myth 1: “I’m not getting the flu shot because it will give me the flu.”

 

The facts

The influenza vaccine cannot give anyone the flu. Vaccines are made with inactivated (i.e., not infectious) flu vaccine viruses or with no flu vaccine viruses at all (called recombinant influenza vaccine). In randomized, blinded studies, other than increased soreness/redness at the site of the vaccine, there was no difference in outcomes among those who received a flu vaccination and those who received a saline injection.

 

Myth 2: “Flu vaccines don’t prevent the flu.”

 

The facts

Recent studies show that vaccines reduce the risk of flu illness by about 50% to 60% among the overall population, according to the CDC. While the effectiveness of the flu vaccine can vary from year to year, vaccination reduces the risk of more serious flu outcomes and may make the illness milder in those who were vaccinated but still get sick.

 

If you are not concerned about getting the flu, think of others. Being able to protect people around you, including those who are more vulnerable to the illness such as babies and older people, may give you the extra motivation to get vaccinated. The first step to healthier communities is being informed, so if you’ve made it this far, consider yourself informed. Now spread the word and share this post.

 

Want to know more about flu vaccinations? Join the conversation on social media at #UnitedAgainstFlu and visit the American Hospital Association website.

 

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Joanna Carmona is communications coordinator at the National Patient Safety Foundation. Contact her at jcarmona@npsf.org.

 

 

Tags:  flu shot  flu vaccine  NPSF 

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Member Spotlight: Elizabeth Duthie

Posted By Joanna Carmona, Wednesday, November 9, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, November 9, 2016

The American Society of Professionals in Patient Safety (ASPPS) is a membership program for professionals

and others interested in patient safety. This is part of a series of member profiles. 


by Joanna Carmona 


Elizabeth Duthie is a lifetime

member of ASPPS

 

Elizabeth Duthie, RN, PhD, director of patient safety, Montefiore Medical Center

 

What does patient safety mean to you?

“It means teamwork. Knowing that someone has your back and will help if things start to go off the rails is an incredibly powerful tool for error prevention. Another critical aspect of patient safety is taking a proactive approach. Asking Where can things go wrong and how do I prevent it? and adopting the aviation philosophy which is What’s the worst thing that could happen and how can I prevent it? is another error prevention strategy we should strive for in health care.

 

"NPSF runs the most impressive

patient safety conference in the nation."
—Elizabeth Duthie

Why did you join the ASPPS?

“NPSF provides excellent educational opportunities. There’s literature alerts, convening of expert panels, and disseminating of cutting edge information. NPSF has really excellent networking possibilities and you can meet so many people at their conferences. Speaking of conferences, I have to say that NPSF runs the most impressive patient safety conference in the nation.”

 

What are some of the biggest challenges you’ll face as you start your new position as patient safety director at Montefiore Hospital?

“The biggest challenge that I have found is leveraging learning after an adverse event occurs. I get that we need short-term fixes for problems after harm occurs, but we can’t stop there. We need to clearly identify the underlying systems if we are to achieve sustainable safety gains.”

 

What keeps you up at night?

“What gives me a worried heart is the tremendous burden of suffering that comes from medical error— the horrible physical and emotional burden for patients, families, and clinicians. In the workplace it has a ripple effect. I have watched colleagues become frightened about their own practice after witnessing the trauma high-performing clinicians experience after a serious sentinel event. They realize if it can happen to him or her, it can happen to me. It just rocks everyone’s world. The drive to stop that harm and the subsequent suffering is what fuels my passion for creating safer systems.”

 

In your opinion, what’s the future of the patient safety field?

“We need to better understand how to build partnerships between providers, clinicians, patients, and families across the continuum of care. I believe the future is when everyone works together not to just deliver excellent care within the hospital but has a commitment to see that excellent care extended into the community.”

 

What is something most people don’t know about you?

“With the help of a retired comic, I performed stand-up comedy in one of my prior jobs. I would come up with jokes about work and perform 10-minute sets at the end of meetings to provide comic relief during the work day!” 

 

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Joanna Carmona is communications coordinator at the National Patient Safety Foundation. Contact her at jcarmona@npsf.org.

 

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Tags:  ASPPS Member Spotlight 

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Five Ways to Take Action Against Antibiotic Resistance

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, November 1, 2016

November 14-20 is Get Smart About Antibiotics Week.


by Patricia McTiernan, MS

Get Smart - Test Your Knowledge About Antibiotics

Take the CDC's quiz about proper use of antitbiotics.

     
     
   

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), each year, more than 2 million people in the United States get infections from germs that are resistant to antibiotics, and at least 23,000 of these people die as a result. The CDC considers antibiotic resistance to be among the most pressing threats to public health today, and the drive is on to increase education and awareness about the issue.


Antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria stop responding to the drugs intended to kill them. This happens over time, as bacteria adapt and change. Inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the problem, because when a strain of bacteria is weakened, but not killed, it can develop ways to survive, or resist, effects of antibiotics.


The CDC leads Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, November 14-20. In advance of the week, here are five ways health care practitioners, patients, and organizations can take action.

  1. Collaborate. It is important for all members of the health care team to work together and with patients and families to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics. Pharmacists and infection control professionals can help advise clinicians on the best antibiotic to use in each case. Clinicians can help patients understand when antibiotics are needed and instruct in the safe use of antibiotics. Find resources for patients and for health professionals.

  2. Stop the spread of bacterial infections. Practicing good hand hygiene consistently every time, with every patient, is the easiest way to reduce the spread of bacteria that cause infections. This applies to health professionals, but also to patients and family members. If you need a refresher course in handwashing, here’s how to do it right.

  3. Prescribe correctly and adhere to prescribing instructions. Estimates suggest that more than half of the prescriptions for antibiotics written in the US each year are, in fact, not necessary. When a bacterial infection is present and antibiotics are the best choice, health care practitioners need to be careful to use an antibiotic that will be effective while causing the least risk of side effects. Clinicians can learn more about safe prescribing.

    Patients need to understand the importance of taking antibiotics exactly as prescribed. Moreover, like all medicines, antibiotics come with risks that patients and families should recognize.

  4. Practice antibiotic stewardship. By instituting an antibiotic stewardship program, health care practices and organizations can improve individual patient outcomes, reduce the burden of antibiotic resistance, and reduce health care costs. The CDC has tools to help organizations get started on antibiotic stewardship.

  5. Share what you learn. Used appropriately, antibiotics save lives and allow for advanced treatment of disease. Yet, according to materials from the CDC, if antibiotic resistance continues unabated, “we risk turning back the clock to a world where simple infections could kill people as they did a century ago.” The World Health Organization and others recognize this as a global threat. Spread the word to your professional colleagues, neighbors, friends, and in your community.

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Do What are your plans for Get Smart about Antibiotics Week? Comment on this post below and visit the CDC at https://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/week/. Note: to post a comment you must be logged in. Register or log in.

 

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fact Sheets, https://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/community/index.html
Pew Charitable Trusts. How Antibiotic Resistance Happens. http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/phg/content_level_pages/issue_briefs/antibioticresistancepdf.pdf


Patricia McTiernan, MS, is editor of the P.S. Blog. Contact her at pmctiernan@npsf.org.

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Tags:  antibiotic resistance  CDC  infection 

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more Calendar

12/7/2016
NPSF Webcast: The Overlap between Organizational Contributions to Burnout and Workplace Violence

12/13/2016
Health IT Webinar Series: Part I

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